I'm a senior at the University of Alabama. I studied abroad in Prague, Czech Republic. It was one of the highlights of my life. If you can, do it. You won't regret it. I'm going to find a way to be a professional traveler. Let me know if you want to join. Ask questions.

 

fishingboatproceeds:

Shailene and Ansel on the #tfios set in Pittsburgh. Such a long and wonderful journey to tonight.

fishingboatproceeds:

Shailene and Ansel on the #tfios set in Pittsburgh. Such a long and wonderful journey to tonight.

ghitaieb asked
" some infinities are bigger than other infinities " : you can't compare infinities because they are limitless; so does that expression mean something figuratively ?

fishingboatproceeds:

You actually can compare infinities even though they are limitless! In the 19th century, Georg Cantor proved that some infinite sets are bigger than others (the infinite set of natural numbers, for instance, is smaller than the infinite set of real numbers. (Minutephysics explains it really well in this video.)

So Van Houten is correct when he tells Hazel that some infinities are larger than others, but Hazel is wrong when she extrapolates this to mean that the set of numbers between 0 and 1 is smaller than the set of numbers between 0 and 2. (In fact, those sets are the same size, as explained in this great video about The Infinite Hotel Paradox.)

So the statement that “some infinities are bigger than other infinities” is literally true, but yes I also intended to mean something figuratively. (I take a lot of solace in knowing that in a universe defined by boundaries—a universe in which everything is temporary and everything will end—we are able to fathom boundlessness, and in fact to know so much about it.)